In the case of agreements between non-competitors, the RDBER is applicable during the R&D period. If the results are valued together, the derogation will apply for seven years from the first placing on the market of the contract products in the EU. If the parties continue to share the results of the R&D at the end of the seven-year period, the block exemption will continue to apply where the parties` combined market share does not exceed 25%. The advantage of the exemption introduced by this Regulation should be limited to agreements for which it is reasonably certain that they fulfil the conditions laid down in Article 101(3) of the Treaty. The prohibition laid down in Article 101(1) of the Treaty shall not apply to agreements already concluded on 31 December 2011 between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. on 1 December 2010 and do not fulfil the conditions for exemption provided for in this Regulation but fulfil the conditions for exemption laid down in Regulation (EC) No 2659/2000. Research and development agreements may include provisions for the partial outsourcing of R&D activities, R&D cooperation or the joint marketing and marketing of jointly developed products. This will enable them to improve efficiency, reduce costs and intensify the exchange of ideas and experiences. The revised Block Exemption Regulation for research and development agreements provides for a new exemption condition, namely that all parties must disclose their existing and pending intellectual property rights before the start of an R&D. In addition, the Commission extends the scope of the `essential restrictions` for both passive and active distribution. However, R&D agreements can sometimes violate Article 101(1) TFEU: due to the increasing complexity of new technologies and rapid technological development, companies are often not able to autonomously monitor technological progress and have to carry out innovation activities open by the establishment of R&D agreements. Despite the obvious advantages that R&D agreements offer to cooperants (e.g.

B the exchange of necessarily financial resources, labour law and knowledge in order to generate new knowledge together or to modify existing knowledge), companies may be reluctant to conclude such agreements, as they fear that they are contrary to EU competition law. This blog examines R&D agreements that the European Commission considers to be pro-competitive. 1. The exemption provided for in Article 2 shall apply under the conditions referred to in paragraphs 2 to 5. Most R&D agreements are not covered by Article 101(1) TFEU, especially when they concern the early nature of R&D cooperation, which is far from being exploited. Agreements between undertakings which are not competing manufacturers of products, technologies or processes which can be improved, replaced or replaced by the results of research and development will eliminate effective competition in research and development only in exceptional circumstances. Therefore, irrespective of the market share of those agreements, it is appropriate to benefit from the exemption introduced by this Regulation and to tackle any exceptional cases by withdrawing the benefit. . . .